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20100904
20100904
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
tasks smoothly and easily. it allows us to move and to speak and to interact with our surroundings, requiring only minimal amount of effort. but when the brain is damaged, its true complex sit revealed. our subject this evening is the neurological disorders. these include parkinson's disease. stroke. huntington's disease and spinal chord injury. these conditions have taught us more about our brain than any other kind of brain disease. through parkinson's we have learned about movement. through stroke we have learned about speech. and through spinal cord injuries we have learned how thoughts give rise to actions. neurological diseases have been a topic of research for sent yees but-- century bus only recently have we developed effective treatments. this evening we will meet a group of scientists who have developed ways to repair or bypass the disordered brain. john done o hew. his work allowed paralyzed patients to move and communicate using only their thoughts and a machine called a brain computer interface. he is a professor at brown university and co-founder of a company called c
on afghanistan? 1,201 u.s. soldiers have died in afghanistan over the last nine years. as of july so far in 2010 alone. >> question, does president obama have an exit strategy for afghanistan? pat buchanan? >> he does not. they are moving away from the mid 2011 deadline from the beginning of withdrawal of troops to show we are committed for a longer period of time. john, the problem is, we can't win the war with the forces we have in there. everybody knows it. however, the country is divided. the administration is divided. they don't want to lose this war and have the taliban execute. they don't want to keep bleeding the country either. they have a real problem in this sense. the liberal ring of the democratic party is moving away from the administration and there's a small antiwar conservative movement that is growing in the media and on capitol hill. so we are coming to a head in december when they had the december review of afghanistan. >> eleanor. >> i don't think they are working away from the july 2011 to begin exiting and they have a review planned for the end of december. and general
think is good news, but it means that it may linger over us for longer than we thought, which means more rain. >> sreenivasan: and in massachusetts, governor deval patrick warned against under-rating the storm. >> the public should continue to take precautions-- stay indoors and off the roads during the height of the storm. exercise extreme caution this afternoon when winds pick up. >> sreenivasan: out on the bay state's coast, inmates from the plymouth county jail shoveled and stacked sandbags. nearly 400 out-of-state utility crews were staged and ready. but as earl kept moving, officials up and down the coast hoped to salvage tourist revenue through labor day weekend. another bombing in pakistan has killed 54 people. it happened in quetta in the southwest, the latest in a series of such attacks. a suicide bomber targeted shiites staging a pro- palestinian rally and procession through the city. police said 160 people were wounded. the pakistani taliban claimed responsibility, and a spokesman claimed the group will launch attacks in america and europe very soon. in afghanistan, the u.s.
>> susie: u.s. unemployment ticked higher last month, but the total number of jobs lost was not as bad as expected. even though nearly 15 million americans are looking for work, some companies still have a hard time filling open positions. >> tom: and many americans who once had careers in the fast lane are going in a new direction, working in the non- profit world. you're watching "nightly business report" for friday, september 3. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: good evening everyone. the unemployment rate now stands at 9.6%. tom, the labor department said 54,000 jobs were lost in august, facorting in census workers, but that number was lower than economists predicted. >> tom: susie, there were some encouraging signs. companies added 67,000 jobs to payrolls, the eighth straight month of job creation in the private sector. we have two stories, the specifics of th
's oval office address provided a useful prame this week that was supposed to be about iraq but it was about so much else, including the economy, uncertain foreign policy and politics. why is august never a good month for barack obama? now we are safely in september, the question must be asked. >> you detected the pattern haven't you. he has had difficulties in augusts and ended this one in a very busy week. when he gave that speech in the oval office, he talked about turning the page. what he meant to convey is, it's time now to focus on the economy. but as that speech showed, the tension in that speech as he was trying to deal with a lot of issues at once underscored the political problems that he and the democrats and the administration have. i mean, he said the economy is my principal responsibility as president. that's why we want to turn the page. but turning the page, let's just start with iraq. yes, the combat mission is over. we still have 50,000 troops in iraq. we will have a troop presence there until the end of next year. violence has not gone. it has been down,
facing the world. -- greatest threat facing the world. they would use chemical or nuclear weapons if they could. the chinese government ordered food producers to start growing more comfortable -- growing more vegetables. in mozambique, seven people died this week in protests about the 30% rise of the cost of bread. the un called for a special meeting to discuss the implications of a price spike. >> more wild fires fanned by strong winds and more houses destroyed and more loss of life after 50 people were killed in july and august. underlying it all is a prolonged drought. they destroyed 20% of russia's wheat crop. the government extended its ban on wheat exports to compensate. thousands of kilometers away in mozambique's plight is starting to return to normal. the trigger was a sharp rise in the cost of bread. the government insisted it had no choice but to raise prices. seven people were killed. nearly 300 were injured. this has left extensive damage. what is happening to food prices? is there a risk of a repeat of the food crisis of 2008? the world saul price climbed -- saw pric
perspectives. up first: young women's earning power: in a wage gap reversal, young women in most us cities are now out-earning their male peers. this, according to a just-released analysis of 2008 census bureau data, finding single, young, childfree women take home, on average, 8% more income than their male counterparts. the income imbalance was initially found in the country's biggest cities such as new york and san francisco, but has since broadened. to smaller cities, too. this new trend is found in white- and blue-collar industries and includes the fast-growing metropolitan areas with large immigrant populations. what's behind the shift? experts point to the growing ranks of women who attend college and move on to high-paying jobs. but while they may be earning more, fewer are doing it on wall street. the number of high-earning female finance workers is dwindling fast due to the recession. this, despite a decrease in sex discrimination charges and a rise in corporate programs to attract and retain women. over the last decade, the finance industry has lost three percent of its female w
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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